Rev. Michael Usey’s sermon on Feb 19, 2012, titled “The Better Angels of our Nature”. “I hope that we as a congregation will work to defeat Amendment One. Prejudice and discrimination against Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgendered persons is morally repugnant and the very opposite of God’s love.” College Park Baptist Church is located in Greensboro, NC.

(Source: collegeparkchurch.com)

"We desire more public space for secularism, space that would recognize secularism as a legitimate moral stance. But we simultaneously desire more religious freedom (which is not the same as advocating more religion)… We want the freedom not to be religious and the freedom to be religious differently… We think it’s important for Americans to come to terms with the fact that Christianity, and often conservative Christianity, functions as the yardstick and measure of what counts as ‘religion’ and ‘morality’ in America… In short, for dissenting views to be heard currently, they have to speak the language of a consensus from which they are already excluded. The price of refusing to speak this common language is either not to be recognized at all or to be recognized only so as to be dismissed as an ‘extremist.’"

— Janet R. Jakobsen and Ann Pellegrini, Love the Sin: Sexual Regulation and the Limits of Religious Tolerance

"The current (Bush) Administration seems to take Catholic views on abortion and family planning very seriously, but it is interesting to consider how different U.S. economic policy would be if the American Catholic bishop’s statements on economics were an integral part of the policy-making process. How much press attention was given to the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishop’s statement in 1999 on debt forgiveness or their appeal to end the death penalty?… Why does religion seem like the natural and appropriate basis for public policies concerning sex, but not for other ethically charged questions?… it is not as if these questions have no moral bearing."

— Janet R. Jakobsen and Ann Pellegrini, Love the Sin: Sexual Regulation and the Limits of Religious Tolerance