"Hip hop—and yes, even “conscious” hip hop—has a problem with homophobia. There’s no point in denying this. From mainstream artists to underground artists to local and amateur acts—homophobia, both indirect (the use of homophobic slurs as a general insult; attend any MC battle and see for yourself) and explicit (overt gay-bashing in lyrics) is far too prevalent in hip hop. Of course, it’s far too prevalent everywhere, but hip hop warrants special attention both because of the nature/frequency of the attacks and the visibility and worldwide influence of the medium. I’d write an article about homophobia in polka music, horse racing, or old-world breadmaking, but the people who participate in those activities aren’t constantly and publicly making idiots out of themselves (while commanding the attention of a global audience) by calling one another “fags.”"

— Guante, Homophobia in ‘Conscious’ Rap

So let’s examine the following propositions: I love Jesus. Jesus is a man. I am a man who loves a man named Jesus.

How could homophobia not affect that most intimate relationship between my Savior and me? I ask this question because I have discovered that homophobia is an obstacle for me as I attempt to grow in intimacy with Jesus. One day I asked in my prayer for Jesus to love me and be fully present with me, and immediately felt uncomfortable being loved by a man or even being physically close to a man. How could I really absorb the embrace Jesus offered when a man’s touch creates intense ambivalence in me?

The simple thesis of this article is that homophobia is an obstacle to spiritual growth for straight men. I write this reflection as a heterosexual man so it is best to qualify my observations and depend on my gay brothers to offer how it might relate to their experience.

"

I have never heard a homily that attempted to explain how a gay man should live, or how his sexuality should be expressed. I have heard nothing but a vast and endless and embarrassed silence, an awkward, unexpressed desire for the simple nonexistence of such people, for their absence from the moral and physical universe, for a word or a phrase, like “objective disorder,” that could simply abolish the problem they represented and the diverse humanity they symbolize. The teaching I inherited was a teaching that, in the best of all possible worlds, I simply would not exist. And it was hard to disobey this; since it was not an order, it was merely a wish.

If articulated, I suppose, the order was abstinence. Abstinence forever; abstinence always; abstinence not for the sake of something else, but for its own sake; abstinence not just from sex, but from love and love’s hope and the touch of a lover’s embrace. Abstinence even from recognition, acknowledgment, family.

"

Love Undetectable by Andrew Sullivan (via thegayguyyouneverknewyouknew)

(via chroniclingmontax)

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Friendly Churches, Temples and Places of Worship
Unitarian Universalist

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Friendly Churches, Temples and Places of Worship

Unitarian Universalist

My favorite line in this article:

It’s kind of like that parable in which Jesus says to the homosexual: “Put that back in your pants.”

"

Christ calls his followers to radical lifestyles rooted in love. Jesus encouraged people to relate to each other through love rather than power. This seems relevant to both sexual relationships and political ones. Jesus’s ethics stand in sharp contrast to the values of corporate power and military might that dominate our world.

When speaking in Oxford yesterday, I was asked why the media report on Christians who are homophobic but rarely mention those who are not. The media cannot take all the blame for this. Pro-equality Christians have often failed to speak up out of a misplaced desire for unity. We have been too ready to accept crumbs from the anti-equality table, such as the Church of England’s feeble decision to allow gay people to become bishops – as long as they never have sex. I believe passionately that it is important to approach our opponents with love and to accept that we can learn from each other however much we disagree. But love involves a commitment to justice. There are times when we must choose between the idol of unity and the God of love.

"

— Symon Hill in The Guardian

essenceofhumanity:

fuckyeahgenderstudies:

This month Symon Hill is walking 160 miles to repent for his former homophobia and to encourage the church to support equality

excerpt from article:

My opposition to homophobia is not motivated by a desire to conform to society’s norms but by a belief in the radical nature of Jesus’s message. Jesus’s teachings have little, if anything, in common with the “family values” lobby. Jesus redefined family, insisting that “whoever does the will of God is my brother, my sister, my mother”. He challenged the sexual values of his time, allowing women to make physical contact with him in a society that found it shocking. He criticised divorce in a context in which only a man could initiate a divorce, throwing his wife into social disgrace or poverty. He socialised with prostitutes. This is not to say that he condoned prostitution, but he saved his harshest words for the rich, the powerful and religious hypocrites who promoted legalism over love.

"Focus on the Family Head: “We’ve Probably Lost” on Gay Marriage"

Focus on the Family Head: “We’ve Probably Lost” on Gay Marriage | Mother Jones

via misabino